Azure Container Instances (ACI) and Secrets - Using Secure Environment Variables

Azure Container Instances (ACI) and Secrets - Using Secure Environment Variables

In this post I'm talking about how you can use something called secureValue, or secure environment variables, with your Azure Container Instance. Given the sensitive nature of some data you put into the variables, it is a good idea to understand different ways to protect some of that data - with secure environment variables you can hide the values from the UI and API calls to the ACI, and from the Azure Portal. BackgroundRunning your applications in the cloud has become increasingly popular. Migrating your .NET applications to .NET Core and hosting them as Docker images in the cloud is…

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Building and running a .NET Core application in a Docker Swarm in Azure, via Docker Cloud

Building and running a .NET Core application in a Docker Swarm in Azure, via Docker Cloud

Introduction In this article I'll walk you through how to set up a Docker Swarm in Azure through the Docker Cloud service. There's plenty of places to host your docker containers, in this post I'm covering the Docker Cloud option with the Swarm Mode on Azure. I will soon post a few guides for ACS (Azure Container Service) and AKS (Managed Kubernetes on Azure Container Service) which also touches upon how to deploy and host your containerized solutions in the Azure cloud. For the sake of this post, I've created a super-simple console application that outputs messages to an Azure…

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Azure Storage REST API: Authenticate with C#

Azure Storage REST API: Authenticate with C#

In one of my projects where I've been refactoring a traditional .NET project into a .NET Core project, I used the Azure Storage nugets. As of this posting, the current version of the NuGet supports .NET Core which is awesome - but the dependencies doesn't. Note: Since this was originally published, the NuGets have been updated, and all SDKs and dependencies fully support all versions of .NET Core. I am now back to using those. If you are using the REST API, continue reading! (When this was published) I chose to use the Azure Storage REST API instead for all…

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Using appsettings.json instead of web.config in .NET Core projects

Using appsettings.json instead of web.config in .NET Core projects

Recently I was in a discussion with an acquaintance about transforming their projects into .NET Core from their full .NET applications. Some of these apps have a few core helpers, including the very common requirement to read from config files. Most notably it's the web.config or app.config. In this post, I'm simply outlining the minimal steps required to get a grasp on how you can replace those files with the ConfigurationBuilder in .NET Core, and what your new json-based configuration files can look like. Another tip-of-the-day. Enjoy. Add settings in a new appsettings.json fileNow, one thing that…

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